Cardiovascular (Echocardiography) and Vascular Sonographers: Updated salary and job information as of 2010 data

Cardiovascular exam

We are all affected by today’s unpredictable economy.  This fact makes it a bit difficult for someone to determine what career path to choose or to even change your existing career path.  So, we are now forced to research longer and deeper than we would have before in order to make the best decision when deciding on what we want to do with our life.  There are a few important facts when considering a career path or change which include work environment, salary, and the predicted future of the chosen field.

When considering sonography, you must first decide which modality would be the best “fit” for you.  Let us take a look at two of the modalities.  For example:   Cardiovascular (Echocardiography) and Vascular Sonography.

Cardiovascular, sometimes referred to as “Echocardiography,” is where the technician uses diagnostic imaging to assist the physicians in the diagnoses of cardiac (heart)  ailments in patients.

Vascular sonography is where the technician uses diagnostic imaging to assist the physicians in the diagnoses of peripheral (blood vessel) vascular ailments in patients such as blood clots.

The work environment for both Cardiovascular and Vascular sonographers are similar.  These technicians usually work in a healthcare facility such as a hospital, clinic, and/or a physician’s office.  Now, another possibility is to work for a “mobile” service where the sonographer is employed by the “mobile” company that is contracted by a physician (physician’s office) who schedules regular patient appointments on a certain day(s) during the month, for example.

As of May 2010, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average starting salary for cardiovascular and vascular technicians is around $49,410.00 per year.  This equates to about $23.75/hour.  The job outlook over the next ten years in this field is expected to increase approximately 29%, which is much faster than the average.  Basically, the increase is due to the evolution of technology allowing medical facilities to replace more invasive procedures with less costly ones.

Patient comfort is important during exam.

Even though hosptials are the primary employers of cardiovascular and vascular technicians, it is predicted that employment will grow more rapidly in physicians’ offices as well as in diagnostic laboratories due to the shift toward outpatient care whenever possible.

In summary, it will also be important to make yourself as “marketable” as possible.
In order to ensure your marketability as a potential employee, it makes sense to be as prepared as possible.  In the world of diagnostic medical imaging, this includes – not limited to- being registered in more than one ultrasound modality.  For example, it is becoming more and more familiar to hear that an employer is looking for a “dual” registered candidate.  This may mean holding dual registries such ash General and Vascular, or Echocardiography/Cardiovascular and Vascular, etc.  Some employers will interview a registered candidate witht the requirement being that the person will sit for the other registry within  six months to one year.  This scenario is becoming more and more common.
With the predicted employment of 63,900 technicians by the year 2020 as Cardiovascular and Vascular technicians, it is imperative to be ready.
Contact us at (866) 867-2824 for information on our next online “cross-over” course in Cardiovascular/Echocardiography and Vascular ultrasound.  Our courses begin on the 1st of each month.

Traveler Sonography Series: Endocarditis; results of echocardiography study

08/05/11

 

Endocarditis

Good afternoon to all of you sonographers; Echocardiographers, General ultrasound technicians, Vascular technicians, and/or our valued blog followers who are interested in various case studies. 

Today’s study involves a patient who has been in hospital for a while and has had to be incubated.  A couple of weeks ago, an echocardiogram was performed that resulted in no unusual findings.   However, new study was completed that detected a large growth.  Listen to the video for the details. 

 

Feel free to express and share your thoughts and experiences.  Again, thanks to the Academy of Ultrasound AND THANK YOU for following our blog.  We appreciate and look forward to your input into the discussion.   If there are specific topics/studies that you would like to discuss or receive more information on, again, do not hesitate to request.  We have many resources and would welcome the opportunity to share with you.

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